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Sedum Care

Sedum is a very hardy and tough plant that is cold hardy to many different growing zones in the United States, ranging from zone 3 to zone 11. Growing stonecrop sedum is becoming more and more popular due to how easy the plants are to grow, the different varieties to choose from, the beautiful flowers the plants produce, and the fact that they are great for wildlife!
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Stonecrop sedum is a perennial typically hardy to zones 3 to 9. The plants have thick and fleshy leaves and foliage, and typically bloom in late summer and fall. Butterflies and bees both love the flowers and will usually be covered in the pollinating insects during the entire blooming season.

Click on each link to read more in depth information on each topic. The information on this page just touches the surface and provides general care information for growing sedum successfully.

Planting Sedum

Sedum plants need a location with soil that is very well drained and with at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. Beyond that, there isn’t really much else that you need to do for the plants in order for them to thrive.

Watering Sedum

Unless you are going through a long period of drought, you won’t need to provide additional water. During dry periods, the plants can be watered around once per week, given the soil completely dries out between watering. It's typically best to under-water than over-water.

Fertilizing Sedum

At most you should fertilize every other year. But you can also just let the plants grow without providing additional nutrients. An easy way to ensure you don’t over-fertilize is by providing mulch or organic compost each year to help the soil. Just make sure the soil still drains properly. 

Pruning Sedum

Sedum can be cut back and divided throughout the year to help ensure the plants have enough space to grow and are looking the best they can. But pruning and trimming is not required for the plants to be healthy.

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Sedum Winter Care

Make sure you are growing a plant hardy in your growing zone, and make sure the soil drains. This is especially important during times when there is a lot of snow and ice on the ground. You can add additional protection by adding some mulch around the plants too.

Growing Sedum in Pots

Garden planters and other containers are great locations for sedum, given the pots have proper drainage. The plants may require more water than if planted in the ground as planters tend to dry up faster. 

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Common Questions About Sedum

Are Sedum Deer Resistant?
Typically deer will not prefer to eat sedum.

Are Sedum Poisonous?
No, sedums are not poisonous.

Why Aren’t My Sedum Blooming?
There are several reasons why your plants aren’t blooming. The most common reason is not getting enough sunlight.